From Quarks to Quasars

Musings On Time: Why The Past, Present & Future Might Run Concurrently (Video)

Time is intrinsically one of those things we never get enough of, but for something so important, it truly is one of the universe’s greatest mysteries. In fact, key principles in physics indicate that our notions of what time is vastly differ from what it actually is.. Learn more: http://bit.ly/1nQTKZn

Musings On Time: Why The Past, Present & Future Might Run Concurrently (Video)

Time is intrinsically one of those things we never get enough of, but for something so important, it truly is one of the universe’s greatest mysteries. In fact, key principles in physics indicate that our notions of what time is vastly differ from what it actually is.. Learn more: http://bit.ly/1nQTKZn

Astronomy Photo of the Day (APotD): 7/29/14 - A Black Hole’s Fury

Since astronomers first uncovered evidence of previously-predicted black holes, they have seen that it’s incredibly difficult to spot them out. Generally, we rely on how they interact with their surroundings to find potential candidates (plus, scouring the sky for their x-ray emissions can help too). Only sometimes, things are much more simplistic, the region seen here is an example of one of those rare instances.

Here, we see the plumes of superheated gas streaming from the central region of a distant galaxy, known as 3C321. Learn more about it here: http://bit.ly/1oFkXgU

Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/CfA/D.Evans et al.; Optical/UV: NASA/STScI; Radio: NSF/VLA/CfA/D.Evans et al., STFC/JBO/MERLIN

Astronomy Photo of the Day (APotD): 7/29/14 - A Black Hole’s Fury

Since astronomers first uncovered evidence of previously-predicted black holes, they have seen that it’s incredibly difficult to spot them out. Generally, we rely on how they interact with their surroundings to find potential candidates (plus, scouring the sky for their x-ray emissions can help too). Only sometimes, things are much more simplistic, the region seen here is an example of one of those rare instances.

Here, we see the plumes of superheated gas streaming from the central region of a distant galaxy, known as 3C321. Learn more about it here: http://bit.ly/1oFkXgU

Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/CfA/D.Evans et al.; Optical/UV: NASA/STScI; Radio: NSF/VLA/CfA/D.Evans et al., STFC/JBO/MERLIN

How Does Gravity Make Things Fall? (Video)
http://bit.ly/1qd8QFR

How Does Gravity Make Things Fall? (Video)
http://bit.ly/1qd8QFR

What Happens When a Black Hole Runs Out of Fuel?

Black holes are one of natures most feared (and misunderstood) features, but like most other things, they have weaknesses and if something has a weakness, it can die. 

That presents a question; Would exhausting a black hole’s fuel supply effectively kill it? Find out here; http://bit.ly/WK1Nw0

Image Credit: Mark A. Garlick

What Happens When a Black Hole Runs Out of Fuel?

Black holes are one of natures most feared (and misunderstood) features, but like most other things, they have weaknesses and if something has a weakness, it can die.

That presents a question; Would exhausting a black hole’s fuel supply effectively kill it? Find out here; http://bit.ly/WK1Nw0

Image Credit: Mark A. Garlick

Those familiar with quantum mechanics might recall a principle called the observer effect. It essentially says that the mere act of observing something changes its behavior, but what exactly does that mean? See: http://bit.ly/1oAs1eB

Those familiar with quantum mechanics might recall a principle called the observer effect. It essentially says that the mere act of observing something changes its behavior, but what exactly does that mean? See: http://bit.ly/1oAs1eB

Astronomy Photo of the Day: 7/28/14 - NGC 3293

Meet NGC 3293, small cluster of stars in the Carina constellation. Here, we can see that the young stars are enshrouded by an immensely large cloud of ionized, gaseous material. The chain reaction that sparked this brilliant glow began about 10 million years ago, when the region was merely a large gas cloud, with bits of dust and some older stars scattered about. Eventually, sections of the cloud collapsed and birthed new stars, which returned the favor by providing the ultraviolet radiation needed to knock atoms of their electrons. Once they found their way back to each other, the glow made its appearance.

Not all of the 50-some stars were born at the same time though. Nor will they die at the same time either, as many of the stars are hot, massive blue-white stars, while some of them are reddish and a bit more elderly. Astronomers have a hunch that some other unknown mechanism driving the population of stars is still at work, but we’ve yet to discover just what that mechanism is and how it functions.

Sources & Other Resources: http://bit.ly/X2FuSk

Image Credit: ESO/G. Beccari

Astronomy Photo of the Day: 7/28/14 - NGC 3293

Meet NGC 3293, small cluster of stars in the Carina constellation. Here, we can see that the young stars are enshrouded by an immensely large cloud of ionized, gaseous material. The chain reaction that sparked this brilliant glow began about 10 million years ago, when the region was merely a large gas cloud, with bits of dust and some older stars scattered about. Eventually, sections of the cloud collapsed and birthed new stars, which returned the favor by providing the ultraviolet radiation needed to knock atoms of their electrons. Once they found their way back to each other, the glow made its appearance.

Not all of the 50-some stars were born at the same time though. Nor will they die at the same time either, as many of the stars are hot, massive blue-white stars, while some of them are reddish and a bit more elderly. Astronomers have a hunch that some other unknown mechanism driving the population of stars is still at work, but we’ve yet to discover just what that mechanism is and how it functions.

Sources & Other Resources: http://bit.ly/X2FuSk

Image Credit: ESO/G. Beccari

Don’t miss the Eta Aquarids meteor shower this Monday!
Learn more about it (and this picture) here: http://bit.ly/UwkTnK

Don’t miss the Eta Aquarids meteor shower this Monday!
Learn more about it (and this picture) here: http://bit.ly/UwkTnK

Where is the center of the universe? Find out here: http://bit.ly/1lYFDME

Where is the center of the universe? Find out here: http://bit.ly/1lYFDME

Watch a Real Video of a Black Hole Stretching a Gas Cloud like Taffy

Our galaxy, like pretty much all of the others we’ve found, harbors a supermassive black hole in its central core, called Sagittarius A*. Unfortunately, the object itself is technically dormant, but it occasionally flares up. In fact, the ESO’s “Very Large Telescope” captured a video showing it shred a gas cloud to pieces.

Learn more here: http://bit.ly/UCWRY6

Watch a Real Video of a Black Hole Stretching a Gas Cloud like Taffy

Our galaxy, like pretty much all of the others we’ve found, harbors a supermassive black hole in its central core, called Sagittarius A*. Unfortunately, the object itself is technically dormant, but it occasionally flares up. In fact, the ESO’s “Very Large Telescope” captured a video showing it shred a gas cloud to pieces.

Learn more here: http://bit.ly/UCWRY6

Astronomy Photo of the Day (APotD): 7/27/14 - A Heavenly Sight

The Moon, Mercury, and Venus are the crowning headpieces for this fantastic image taken just before sunrise at the Australia Telescope Compact Array (also known as ATCA). Located near Narrabri, New South Wales, this array consists of six radio telescopes making up one of the highest resolution telescope arrays in the world.

Mercury is the highest and smallest of the three objects seen in this image, after that, the Moon and Venus are engaged in their own celestial dance which played out gracefully over the next few nights.

From: http://bit.ly/1l4BB4E

Image Credit: Graeme L. White and Glen Cazens

Astronomy Photo of the Day (APotD): 7/27/14 - A Heavenly Sight

The Moon, Mercury, and Venus are the crowning headpieces for this fantastic image taken just before sunrise at the Australia Telescope Compact Array (also known as ATCA). Located near Narrabri, New South Wales, this array consists of six radio telescopes making up one of the highest resolution telescope arrays in the world.

Mercury is the highest and smallest of the three objects seen in this image, after that, the Moon and Venus are engaged in their own celestial dance which played out gracefully over the next few nights.

From: http://bit.ly/1l4BB4E

Image Credit: Graeme L. White and Glen Cazens